Trahira
(Hoplias spp.)
ERYTHRINIDAE FAMILY; also called anyumara, patakka, amaira, tararira, trairão, dorme-dorma, lobó, perro, guabina, tigerfish
This South America fish occurs in the Amazon Basin, Orinoco Basin, and coastal rivers in Guyana, Suriname, and French Guiana. They occur in diverse habitats from free flowing clear water streams to slow turbid waters. Trahira prefer shallow water along shorelines amid water plants, where they wait for fish, frogs and insect that are their prey.
Trahira are voracious predators with large mouths and very sharp canine-like teeth. Its body is dark brown or black with gray spots. The cylindrical fish large eyes and heavy scales, fins are rounded except the dorsal fin. Some trahira species can reach about 39 in (100 cm) and 30 lb (14 kg), although smaller fish are usually encountered.
Anglers find the trahira to be an extremely voracious, attacking natural and artificial lures as well as flies. Noisy lures such as poppers and spinners baits seem to attract the trahira and make fishing more productive. Trahira are edible, but not highly prized because the flesh is quite bony
 

Current All Tackle Record

9 lbs 6oz ( 4.26 kg)

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