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IGFA Releases 2021 Program Report

IGFA Releases 2021 Program Report Promoting ethical sport and productive […]

Registration Open for the Inaugural IGFA SoCal Swordfish Open

Registration Open for the Inaugural IGFA SoCal Swordfish Open Celebrating […]

Tips for Docking Your Boat with a Single Outboard

Tips for Docking Your Boat with a Single Outboard This […]

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About Us

The IGFA is a nonprofit organization committed to the conservation of game fish and the promotion of responsible, ethical angling practices through science, education, rule making, record keeping and recognition of outstanding accomplishments in the field of angling.

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2 days ago

IGFA
Did you know? Both the Men’s and Women’s 60-kg (130 lb) Line Class Records for dolphinfish are currently vacant. To qualify a fish must weigh at least 29.48-kilograms (65-pounds) and be landed on line over 80 lb test and under 130 lb test. While a 65-pound dolphinfish is no small feat the opportunity exists! We will be highlighting more vacant records in the weeks to come so stay tuned.Photo by Sportfish Gallery ... See MoreSee Less
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3 days ago

IGFA
Andrew Thompson of RodsbyDru recently submitted this beautiful 23.13-kilogram (51-pound) dolphinfish to join the IGFA Trophy Dolphinfish Club. Andrew and his family recently took a trip to the famous Tropic Star Lodge in Pinas Bay, Panama 🇵🇦. The trip was very successful yielding this massive dolphinfish along with several potential world records. Stay tuned next week for more shots from this trip. To be entered for the Trophy Club a dolphinfish must either measure 127 cm (50 in) long or weigh more than 22.7-kg (50 lb). #fishIGFA ... See MoreSee Less
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3 days ago

IGFA
A new scientific article was published in June in the journal Functional Ecology by Harding et al. examining the role of endothermy (ability to regulate body temperature) in the swimming ability of a variety of fishes. Many species of fish and sharks have evolved to be semi-endothermic such as the swordfish that can heat its brain and eyes warmer than surrounding waters. The study found that, on average, these endothermic fish swim at 1.6 times the speed of cold-blooded (ectothermic) fish. The study shows the evolutionary advantage to being partially warm-blooded lies in improved swimming performance and not necessarily in broadening their habitat by allowing them to swim in colder waters. For more information check out the full publication at ➡️ bit.ly/3isuR6A.Image courtesy of Sportfish Gallery ... See MoreSee Less
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